Day Trip to The Met Cloisters

Our very own Fr. W. Patrick Edwards provided commentary on┬ámedieval church history and its significance as friends of St. John’s Episcopal Church toured The Met Cloisters. ┬áThe Met Cloisters is the branch of The Metropolitan Museum of Art dedicated to the art, architecture, and gardens of medieval Europe. Opened to the public in 1938, and deriving its name from the five medieval cloisters that form the core of the building, it presents a harmonious and evocative setting for more than 2,000 exceptional works of art and architectural elements from the medieval West.

Along with strolling through the gardens, we took in paintings, tapestries, chapels, carvings and halls designed for different periods. While the Late Gothic Hall showcases 15th-century limestone windows and altarpieces from Germany, Italy and Spain, the Romanesque Hall features stone portals from 12th and 13th-century French churches. Lunch was enjoyed over the impressive views of the Hudson River from The Cloisters hilltop setting.